Terradillos de los Templarios To Bercianos Real Camino

Day Thirty Six. 25.1 K., 15.6 Mi., (my pedometer).

Written on June 4, 2014.

Not long after we left Terradillos there was a small Labyrinth on the side of the trail. A great way to start a day of walking…walking a Labyrinth. I was focused on saying mantras and being grateful for all of my experiences. Thanks to anyone and everyone who created the Labyrinth.

After our first break Vern walked ahead to Sahagun. While I was walking two women were passing me. I greeted them and noticed that one of them had a very cool band on her hat. I complimented her hat and they both proceeded to tell me what they were doing and why they were walking.

Sidney and Izabela walking for children in Africa.

A placard on the back of each woman's backpack.

To find out more: “like” and follow them at: Facebook.com/walkforhopeofchildren. Also, more info at: clotheavillagenow.com.

A bridge on the way to Sahagun.

Today Angel left Terradillos after us, passed us, and arrived in Bercianos with plenty of time to settle in to the Albergue Santa Clara and get acquainted with more Pilgrims.

A card “magic” trick performed by Ruben. Angel, where is the 9 of hearts?

A sign at a bar in Bercianos.

 

Carrion de los Condes To Terradillos de los Templarios

Day Thirty Five. 27.8 K., 17.3 Mi. (my pedometer).

Written on June 3, 2014.

We stayed at Hostal Santiago in Carrion de los Condes. It was a beautiful room and we received great service! In the morning as we were leaving we noticed that the way out was through the bar and not through the gate. If you love your coffee in the morning like Vern and Angel this works well.

Today we are walking on the Calzada Romana, also known as the Calzada de los Peregrinos.

Most of the walk today is on the Calzada Romana.

From the first moment we started walking on April 30th Angel has been helping people from all over the world. She will observe something out of place or that needs adjustment on their backpacks. She is good about sensing whether the time or place is appropriate to approach the Pilgrim. She has helped many people! Today she received a kiss for her efforts.

Angel checking the adjustments to a Pilgrim's backpack.

Yesterday I heard someone walking away from Angel saying very loudly, “perfect, perfect”!

Today Chris asked me if I had seen the couple on bicycles who just got married. My first thought was, “this is pretty cool, people know that I'm writing a blog and now are giving me tips”!

Newlyweds' bicycles.

The newly weds, Jesus and Natalia, as they rode by me.

My favorite waymarker on the Camino!

 

Fromista To Carrion de los Condes

Day Thirty Four. 21.1 K., 13.1 Mi.

Written on June 2, 2014.

We turned around just in time to see the first glimpse of the sunrise.

Sunrise over Fromista.

Vern at the first bar to have coffee.

Stork with babies on top of a church.

At the last break of the day Vern went inside the bar to order an orange juice. Angel overheard the SeƱora correcting his Spanish pronunciation of orange.

The bar provides lodging, food, drinks and Spanish lessons:)

Vern wearing his “bug hat”. Wish I had mine!

 

Castrojeriz To Fromista

Day Thirty Three. 27.0 K., 16.8 Mi. *(My pedometer).

Written on June 1, 2014.

*A note: when I show mileage with (my pedometer) following it is because I have noticed changes to the Camino that are not listed in my guide book. I trust the mileage on my pedometer more than the mileage listed in the guide book.

This morning we go up, up, and further up to Alto de Mostelares. For those of us who have to take it slow and easy it is a great time to insert headphones into our ears. I am not beyond letting music help me in certain situations. The first song that came up: “It's A Long Way To The Top If You Want to Rock'n Roll” by Lucinda Williams!

Directly above Vern and Angel is the path to Alto de Montelares.

The view from the top of Alto de Mostelares.
Angel and I before we make the long descent into the valley.

Volunteers at a Pilgrim rest…fruit, coffee, etc., for a donation!

Vern on Puente de Itero.

Puente de Itero is a Romanesque structure that has eleven arches. The Rio Pisuerga provided the natural boundary between Castilla and Leon.

Canal de Castilla.

We walked many miles into Fromista today along the canal.

 

Hornillos del Camino to Castrojeriz

Day Thirty Two. 22.4 K., 13.9 Mi.

Written on May 31, 2014.

It's early morning and the trail winds it's way up a hill. When I get to the top I like to look behind me. Some of the greatest photos I have taken are of where I have been.

Theos, Francois, and Angel not far behind me.

Vern and I know of a place in the Meseta between Hornillos del Camino and Castrojeriz. It is a municipal Albergue, San Bol, that has had the reputation of being a hippie Albergue. We are fascinated by the claims of magic water. In our guide book it says, “the waters from the well are said to have healing properties and to cure aching feet”.

Sign and marker for San Bol.

Angel and I are walking together. Vern had said that he was going to stop in San Bol so we walk 100 meters off the Camino to see if he is still there.

Just in time to see Vern put his feet in the water.

Angel doesn't have to say anything. Her face shows how cold the water is!

I take a moment of mental preparation so that I am able to keep my feet in the water.

We go inside the Albergue to get warm and have breakfast that they are now serving.

Today is the first time that I see the Pilgrim dog. He is carrying his own pack. At a break in Hontanas he was even playing with a ball.

A pilgrim and his dog.

San Anton, ancient monastery. A road goes through the ruins.

There is an operational private Albergue here.

Lots of flowers on the path today.

 

Burgos To Hornillos del Camino

Day Thirty One. 19.5 K., 12.1 Mi.

Written on May 30, 2014.

The walk out of Burgos is like an art walk, much like the city itself is.

A sculpture near the University.

A fountain on the way out of town.

Pilgrim creativity!

Pilgrims have told me that their guidebooks suggest that they take a bus and avoid the Meseta, (high plains). I love the vastness and solitude of this beautiful area.

Welcome to the Meseta!

On May 20th I had first mentioned Theos, the donkey and Francois. We had first seen Theos when he was crossing the bridge in Puente La Reina. Today I was grateful to see this beautiful animal in the Meseta!

Theos at a Pilgrim rest stop.

Chris and Ursula from South Africa walking backwards down the hill!
 
 

 

Day Off In Burgos

Day Thirty.

Written on May 29, 2014.

A great day to sleep in, go have coffee, and take care of errands. One of the most important things to do today is have my clothes washed in a machine. Since April 30th I have washed my clothes by hand. I found a dry cleaners who would wash them in a machine and not dry them. Two years ago on the Camino I had my clothes washed and dried…they shrunk. Now it's time to go explore.

Nancy, Vern, and Jim with one of our favorite sculptures.

Today we saw many Pilgrims that we know in Burgos. It was fun getting together without being tired after walking all day.

We found a sporting goods store and bought Vern a pair of sandals. I went to the library and printed boarding passes to be used at the end of June. As we were walking around Burgos we kept seeing more Pilgrims and started making dinner plans. When we did start to gather to make our way to a place to eat I noticed that another group was forming close by. I heard someone say that they were going to Dane's concert. Dane had walked by me several days ago with a cello on his back. I had been wanting to see him play. This was the perfect opportunity. I told Vern and who could hear that I was going to the concert and took off to follow the people who knew where they were going.

The line for Dane's concert in front of Monasterios de Huelgas.
Dane and I after his cello performance.
For more information about Dane, the Pilgrim cellist, go to walktofisterra.com.