Rest Day Leon

Day Thirty Nine.

Written on June 7, 2014.

This was not a planned rest day. Yesterday after arriving in Leon: Vern, Angel, and I met up with Jim from Florida. We wanted to spend some time with Jim. He walks faster than us…this was a great opportunity to see him. There was a festival in Leon. Some vendors were passing out food samples. Vern ate some chorizo from a sample plate. A few hours later he was sick. We had reserved a room for one night, not two. When it seemed that we would need two nights the receptionist said they were completely full for the next night. I did not know it but she continued to try to find us a room in “sold out” Leon. In the morning she informed me that she found us a room…just a 5 minute walk. Thank you La Posada Regia for taking good care of us.

Angel and I made sure that Vern had everything he needed. We went out looking for ginger ale. While we walked around we saw more festival activity.

Festival “Knights”.

An herb stand.

A “ride” for kids.

 

Puente Vilarente To Leon

Day Thirty Eight., 14,3 K., 8.9 Mi. (my pedometer).

Written on June 6, 2014.

We planned on a “short” day of walking today so that we could have more time in Leon, a large city, where many Pilgrims gather. On the way in I saw Amalia. I met Amalia several days ago when I was walking. We spent some time talking and walking together. I was grateful to see her today.

Nancy and Amalia.

There are many ways to keep Pilgrims off of busy roads.

Vern walking on a pedestrian overpass on the way to Leon.

As we were crossing the road into Leon I saw what seemed to be a checkpoint. As we walked closer it was a Pilgrim greeting station. The greeters were the Guardia de Civil, (police). They were offering a sello, (stamp), and a map.

A Pilgrim, Vern, and the greeters.

Not far behind us in line was a Mom and four children from New Zealand. I spoke with her for a few minutes. Her and her children are walking for charity. Check out their blog: http://charitywalking.wordpress.com/

The Mom, third from left, and her four children.

The back of the Mom’s backpack.

When we entered Leon we walked into a festival!

Musicians in Leon.

A parade of donkeys in Leon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santiago To Pamplona By Train

Day Eighteen. Travel by train.

Written on May 17, 2014.

Thanks Kathy for sharing a great three weeks with us. My belief is that the Camino is a microcosm of what we call life. What we tend to ignore or deny rises up. Sometimes it rises up loudly, sometimes in “deafening silence”. I am grateful to have shared this time with you, Kasie, Angel, and Vern. Kathy is starting her journey home to the U.S. Vern, Angel, and I are going to Pamplona today to meet our friend, Dieter from Belgium. Kasie flew out of Santiago on May 11th.

Kathy on the Camino.

Angel and Dieter in Pamplona.

Vern and I met Dieter on the Camino Frances in 2012. He was bicycling and we were walking. It is a miracle that we became friends due to the fact that bicyclists can travel many more miles. Thanks Dieter for taking the time and energy to visit us in Pamplona!

A typical street in Pamplona tonight!

 

Santiago To Pamplona By Train

Day Eighteen. Travel by train.

Written on May 17, 2014.

Thanks Kathy for sharing a great three weeks with us. My belief is that the Camino is a microcosm of what we call life. What we tend to ignore or deny rises up. Sometimes it rises up loudly, sometimes in “deafening silence”. I am grateful to have shared this time with you, Kasie, Angel, and Vern. Kathy is starting her journey home to the U.S. Vern, Angel, and I are going to Pamplona today to meet our friend, Dieter from Belgium. Kasie flew out of Santiago on May 11th.

Kathy on the Camino.

Angel and Dieter in Pamplona.

Vern and I met Dieter on the Camino Frances in 2012. He was bicycling and we were walking. It is a miracle that we became friends due to the fact that bicyclists can travel many more miles. Thanks Dieter for taking the time and energy to visit us in Pamplona!

A typical street in Pamplona tonight.

Check out video below:

http://youtu.be/rJuqKm47T6M

Barbadelo to Portamarin

Day Seventy Three. 13.0 Miles, 21.0 Kilometers.

Written on July 1, 2012.

It was a misty morning with low fog. Our first break was with Pam from Colorado. Pam found a bar/cafe that served fruit, yogurt, fresh pastries, and great coffee! She saw us as we began to pass by. She let us know that the cafe was open.

We are now nearing the 100 Kilometer marker on the Camino de Santiago. A Pilgrim is entitled to a Compostela for walking 100 Kilometers. Two stamps a day are needed on a Pilgrim passport once you pass Sarria. Sarria is the closest town on the Camino to the 100 Kilometer point. Many pilgrims arrive in Sarria to begin their walk to Santiago.

The 100 K. marker.

After walking for awhile there was a pilgrim rest. On the sign above the rest all that was requested is, “Please leave this area clean like you found it”. It means a lot to find a sheltered place to sit.

Pilgrim rest.

To arrive in Portamarin you must cross a bridge, climb many stairs, and enter under an arch. It is a wonderful town elevated above a river.

The Arch at Portamarin.

At first it seemed as if there was a party already starting in honor of the World Cup that Spain is in tonight with Italy. After watching for awhile I realized that the procession was coming from the church.

Procession walking on a “carpet” of plants.

As soon as we arrived we did our shopping for the next day and took a nap. We packed our backpacks and wanted to be ready to go. We went downstairs to the restaurant to eat dinner. We found a good spot to watch the game when it started at 8:45 p.m. Soon we saw people that we know: Tom, Kat, Shaunna, Louis, Kim, and Scott. There was a bar and a restaurant area, the bar filled up quickly. We watched the entire futbol (soccer) game…Spain won 4 – 0! It was a fun time. I found myself really getting into it and happy that Spain won. Everyone was excited. It was exciting for most pilgrims from all over the world to help Spain celebrate their victory.

Spain, World Cup Champions.

Najera to Santo Domingo de la Calzada

Day Fifty Two. 14 Miles, 22.5 Kilometers.

Written on June 10, 2012.

Sometimes I wonder how do we know if we’re on the Camino de Santiago? Yes, there are yellow arrows pointing the way and since 2009 there are added manufactured signs that are very easy to follow. But today when I saw this ancient marker I knew that we were walking exactly where pilgrims of centuries past have walked.

Ancient way marker.

We steadily climbed today from Azofra to Ciruena. Ciruena seems to be an attempt at creating a suburb. There is a golf course, condos and apartments.

Pilgrim sculpture in a roundabout in Ciruena.

Many days ago between Ronscavalles and Zubiri we had to walk on the highway. As we started to walk on the highway I heard singing behind me. I turned around and saw a group of Pilgrims pushing a man in a wheel chair and walking beside him for traffic “control”.

Not shown: two women with waist straps ready to pull their friend.

As we entered Santo Domingo de la Calzada we heard a marching band and saw a crowd of people. We learned that it was a Corpus Christi festival. Many children participated. Girls were throwing rose petals through the crowd.

The Corpus Christi Festival.

In St. Jean Pied-de-Port, France we stayed in L’Esprit Albergue. That is where we first met Ali and Maire. Later the next day we saw them as we were all making our way through the Pyrenees. Today we celebrate with them their determination and achievement of walking from St. Jean to Santo Domingo in 11 days. They walked in joy, love, and laughter. We are grateful for time spent with them.

Ali and Maire. The best of friends.