Lavacolla To Santiago de Compostela

Day Fifty Three. 9.5 K., 6 Mi.

Written on June 21, 2014.

Today is special in so many ways. Yes, we have walked into Santiago de Compostela before this day. Vern and I are now walking in with our daughter who has been with us since April 30th when we first started walking from Porto, Portugal. We have witnessed many transformations in ourselves and in others.
We were walking in at a steady pace when a Pilgrim from South Korea stopped us to let us know that he remembered us from 2012. At that time he had walked with his son, now he walked with his wife. This moment was one of the “treasures” of the Camino for us.
Gregorio, Teresa, Vern, and Nancy.
Vern took a moment to have some fun.
Nancy, Angel, and Vern in front of the Cathedral.
Since 2008 I have explored as many forums, blogs, and Camino websites as I could find. The Camino de Santiago Forum, admin, Ivar Rekve has provided a format for Pilgrims and “soon to be Pilgrims” to obtain inspiration and valuable information regarding many subjects that pertain to the Camino. Ivar also offers a Pilgrim storage service in Santiago. On April 29th Vern, Angel, and I mailed two boxes from Porto, Portugal to Ivar. He emailed me to let me know that he received the boxes. There is a charge for this service. The post office, however, will not store for the length of time that we needed. Check out the Forum and storage information: http://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/
Ivar And Nancy.
Today I saw something that I tried to capture the best I could with a photo. I saw the boots right after a heavy rain….but I knew what I must do.
This photo was taken laying on the ground.

Many bicyclists lined up for their Compostelas.

We saw Dane Johansen's film crew on our way into Santiago. They said that he would be playing inside the Cathedral at 4:00 p.m. This is an opportunity to enjoy his music one more time. The “alcove” where he played was filled to capacity. His father had flown in from Anchorage. It was clear that Dane was filled with emotion.

A Pilgrim who translated for Dane many times and Dane.

Bagpipe music defines, for me, the completion of the Camino. Please check out this short video of what welcomes you into Santiago on the Camino Frances: http://youtu.be/5K8S-vN7gxc

Everyday on the Camino, or not, I am looking for opportunities to have fun. This video shows groups of Pilgrims celebrating and having fun in front of the Cathedral: http://youtu.be/-o4JPAhbGg

Please view and share this wonderful video created by Koala Enarmagnac with his original song/music.

http://youtu.be/o0Pg1FQjH5U

Thank you for reading this blog, sharing it with your friends, your comments, and support!!! Looking for interesting photos, taking the photos, and preparing the stories in my mind helped me during those moments when my body was struggling with one more hill or while trying to stay cool in the middle of a hot day. You are, and have been very much a part of our Camino. Buen Camino!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salceda To Lavacolla

Day Fifty Two. 20.3 K., 12.6 Mi.

Written on June 20, 2014.

We are a day closer to Santiago de Compostela! We have chosen to spend the night in Lavacolla so that we will have a short walk into Santiago in the morning. Much of the walk today was through eucalyptus groves.

A creative bench in a grove.

A tractor and a “trailer” on the Camimo.

Vern, Angel, and I love to see furry friends. Today I saw a beautiful Cocker.

A Cocker with a mission.

As I made my way down a mountain and finally made it to level ground I saw a beautiful waymarker. I was ready to take a photo when a Pilgrim motioned to me that he would take the photo of me and the waymarker.

Thanks to the Pilgrim from France for taking this photo.

 

Melide To Salceda

Day Fifty One. 28.6 K., 17.8 Mi.

Written on June 19, 2014.

I am fascinated by Horreos. I would like to have one in front of my home! Here is a link for more information: http://sheilacampbell.com/horreos-of-galicia/ from the website: sheilacampbell.com.

A beautiful Horreo, pronounced = Oreo.

An old waymarker.

Sometimes I feel like I should look around and see what is behind me. Some of my best photos are a result of this “feeling”.

A Father, two sons from Germany, and a Pilgrim friend.

A Memorial for a Pilgrim on the way to Salceda.

The daily livestock commute.

 

 

 

 

 

Palas de Rei To Melide

Day Fifty. 16.6 K., 10.3 Mi.

Written on June 18, 2014.

While I walk I look for something, anything, that I haven’t seen before on this Camino.

A large shell in a backyard on the Camino.

A waymarker made out of shells on a home.

Angel and I were leaving a cafe after having a much needed break. She told me about a young woman from Denmark who is walking with her Mother and Grandmother. I told Angel that I will be looking for the three women when they pass me.

Three generations from Denmark!

Pilgrims are use to moving for cars, bicycles, cows, sheep, motorcycles, and tractors.

Today Angel moved for a semi-truck on the Camino!

Angel and Vern under an arch in Melide.

Today when Angel was checking into the Albergue the woman pointed at her birthday. It was the same day and year as Angel’s!

Angel and Maria, the same age!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gonzar to Palas de Rei

Day Forty Nine. 18.5 K., 11.5 Mi.

Written on June 17, 2014.

A few days ago we met Dai at an Albergue in El Acebo. He recently emailed a photo that he had taken of us.

Vern, Angel, and Nancy.

When Pilgrims began to leave the Albergue I was wide awake. I decided to get up and get ready while Vern and Angel were sleeping. When I was ready to go I realized that they were still sleeping. I let Vern know that I was leaving and started walking.

A contrast of new and old.

Some form of a Palloza.

I stopped to take a break in a village and saw Vern and Angel walking so I called out to them. As soon as they arrived Vern told me that he had found money in the bathroom at the last Albergue. Soon after he told me the story two sisters who we had met the night before arrived. They started to tell us that their sister and Mother were behind them. The sister discovered that she had lost her money and went back to the Albergue for a possible 4k. detour. Vern asked them how much money…they said 15 or 20 euros. He had found 20 euros. He handed them a 20 euro bill. They immediately texted their sister. All we could say is, “That's the Camino”!

Pilgrims walking into Palas de Rei.

 

Ferrerios To Gonzar

Day Forty Eight. 18.2 K.,11.3 Mi.

Written on June 16, 2014.

Today we are walking from one small “village” to another small “village”. Why I am putting quotations around the word village is because I am not quite sure if they are villages. They are more like a group of structures. I am enjoying staying in remote, out of the way places. When we decided to walk shorter distances as much as possible we found ourselves walking to the less busy places on the Camino.

A Pilgrim “shrine” on the way to Gonzar.

Portomarin is a town on the way to Gonzar. It is unique and beautiful. Vern is walking into Portomarin to get some Euros and coffee. I am walking ahead to Gonzar.

The bridge on the way into Portomarin.

A view of the church in the center of Portomarin.

Most of the walking paths today were uphill. I was grateful that most of them were also shaded.

A gathering of stacked stones and pine cones.
Many times along the side of the Camino there will be stones stacked on top of each other, way markers made out of stones, pine cones, etc., or even Labyrinths. I love seeing these works of art and love.

 

Sarria To Ferrerios

Day Forty Seven. 13.6 K., 8.4 Mi.

Written on June 15, 2014.

Vern and Angel were ahead of me and I knew that we would meet at the first bar they came to. As I was walking I heard people yelling “California, California”!!!

I am use to hearing bicyclists yelling so I didn't pay much attention. Soon I was being hugged by Fabian from Germany….close behind him was his good friend, Alex from New York. It was so good to see them and I knew Vern and Angel would love to see them, too.

Nancy, Vern, Angel, Alex, and Fabian.

We continued walking. I wasn't sure if the 100K marker was before the Albergue in Ferrerios or not. Soon we found it. The importance of the 100K marker is that if you walk from here you can receive a Compostela in Santiago.

Nancy and Vern at the 100K marker.

A bridge on the way to Ferrerios.